I don’t want anything

When it comes to funeral arrangements I don’t want anything, however I don’t want to tell people around me this as it’s only going to upset them.

I don’t want anything because it’s another example of the lack of beliefs that I hold.

Richard Dawkins for instance, when he dies, is likely to have a huge funeral.  He is after all a cultural Christian.  Part of this is the implicit belief that there is something mystical and special about a dead body.  Atheists believe this because they’re not really atheists.  Atheists don’t see a dead body as an inconveniently rotting piece of meat to be disposed of as such, but rather as a special and sacred thing.

If an atheist sees a religious person kissing a statue they will think “That poor deluded idolator” and yet they will go along to a funeral and effectively do the same thing.  The reason for this of course is that an atheist is infact religious – they just can’t get to grips with their own religiosity.

In terms of what I want, I don’t want anything, but in a society following the religion of liberal humanism, fake Christianity and fake Atheism this becomes a problem.  Not wanting anything becomes something  quite major in itself.

Normally if you* want to dispose of something for instance, you just put it in the bin but you can’t just put a body in a bin because someone will likely find it and then it will be all on.  So it would have to be disposed of in such a way as not to cause undue alarm among the citizenry.

One option is to donate your body to science but even if you do that, it seems that nothing is going to stop people from erecting a religious monument to that.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2005907/So-thats-happens-donate-body-science–600-peoples-remains-buried-single-grave.html

I suppose it would be possible for a person to donate their remains to science with the proviso that when it is ‘used’ it is disposed of like any other medical waste in the hospital system.

Even this has problems however as it suggests that a dead person still has agency after their death, when in reality there is no reason that should be.  So the more correct response would be to say “Do whatever you want” and hope that they understand what you wanted when you were alive.

One thing I should mention however is that I’m not against people celebrating my death – ‘party it up’!  Any excuse for a party is a good one, so I wouldn’t want to deprive people of that.

 

* I often say 'you' when I mean 'one' because I think that 'one' sounds too formal and English upper class.  Sorry if there is any inaccuracy in interpretation because of this.
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